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Archive for July, 2011

Breaking the Achy Cycle

July 14, 2011 Leave a comment

I know several elderly people; relatives, neighbors and parents of friends and acquaintances. Each of them live in different environments, pursue different lifestyles and have varying levels of health conditions. Although some of them are less prone to complaining than others, one common thread is that when asked how they’re doing, all of them say pretty much the same thing. They have aches and pains.

One of these days, rather than listen sympathetically, I’m going to ask the question. “If you could spend 15 minutes each day doing something that would lead to overall better health, fitness and peace of mind, would you do it?”

Tai Chi is a slow motion, low impact, stretching, moving form of meditative exercise for relaxation and better health. It doesn’t involve kicking, leaping or running. The exercise uses a set of “forms” which consist of a sequence of movements. The way the “forms” are performed in Tai Chi is slowly, softly and gracefully with smooth and even transitions between them.

Originally, from China, Tai Chi has gained enormous popularity in America and throughout the rest of the world for its health benefits and has been proven a way for elderly people to get back into exercising.

What it helps: Because of the slow movements, Tai Chi promotes calmness and relaxation, while also helping participants to slow their breathing. This may lead to lower blood pressure. This is especially beneficial for older practitioners, but low blood pressure is good for everyone. The continuous movements of Tai Chi that increase flexibility have also been shown to reduce the pain of arthritis and improve general physical function. Practicing Tai Chi on a regular basis can potentially provide enough exercise to help lower high cholesterol.

What it prevents: The postural elements of Tai Chi helps in preventing dangerous falls,  backache, stiff neck, gastric reflux, and easing the effects of osteoporosis and Dowager’s hump. It strengthens the immune system and helps reduce loss of muscle mass and strength.

With grants from the National Institute on Aging, a study was done on how the ancient Chinese exercise form can help older people feel better and regain some the physical functioning they may have lost to inactivity.

The study included 72 people between the ages of 65 and 96 who were split into a group that went to an hour-long class twice a week for six months and a control group that was promised a four-week class at the end ofthe study.

“We found significant improvements within three months on a low intensity program conducted twice a week. Our results also showed improved benefits from six months of participation, suggesting that additional health gains can be derived from a longer period of participation,” the researchers say.

On completion of the study, the Tai Chi students were also twice as likely as the control group to report not being limited in their ability to perform moderate to vigorous activities.

Seniors interested in trying out the exercise form and the likelihood of being free of aches and pains, can contact their local senior center or visit American Tai Chi and Quigong Association to find a class locator.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Los Angeles and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

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The Shrinking Supply of Primary Care Physicians

July 6, 2011 1 comment

Primary care physicians are already in short supply in many parts of the country. The passing of the landmark Health Care Reform bill will bring them millions more newly insured patients in the next few years and promises even more of a strain. The new law goes beyond offering coverage to the uninsured, with steps to improve the quality of care for the average person and help keep us well instead of today’s seek-care-after-you’re-sick culture. However, to take advantage, you will need a regular primary care physician. Recently published reports predict a shortfall of roughly 40,000 primary care doctors over the next decade, a profession losing out to the better pay, better hours and higher profile of many other specialties. Provisions in the new law aim to start reversing that tide, from bonus payments for certain physicians to expanded community health centers that will pick up some of the slack.

The law offers incentives to encourage more people to enter medical professions, and a 10% Medicare pay boost for primary care doctors. Also at issue, is the need for affordable education for would be primary care physicians. To cope with the growing shortage, federal officials are considering several proposals. One would increase affordable enrollment in medical schools and residency training programs. Another would encourage greater use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A third would expand the National Health Service Corps, which deploys doctors and nurses in rural areas and poor neighborhoods. The U.S. has 352,908 primary care doctors now, and the college association estimates that 45,000 more will be needed by 2020. However, the number of medical school students entering family medicine fell more than a quarter between 2002 and 2007. Senator Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat and chairperson of the Finance Committee, said, “Medicare payments were skewed against primary care doctors, the very ones needed to coordinate the care of older people with chronic conditions such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.”

Physician 2 by *stitchxwitch on deviantART

A number of new medical schools have opened around the country recently. As of last October, four new schools enrolled about 190 students, and 12 medical schools raised the enrollment of first year students by a total of about 150 slots, according to the AAMC. Some 18,000 students entered U.S. medical schools in the fall of 2009, the AAMC says. Medicare pays $9.1 billion a year to teaching hospitals, which goes toward resident salaries and direct teaching costs, as well as the higher operating costs associated with teaching hospitals, which tend to see the sickest and most costly patients. Doctors’ groups and medical schools had hoped that the new health care law passed in March, would increase the number of funded residency slots, but such a provision did not make it into the final bill. The residency is the minimum three year period when medical school graduates train in hospitals and clinics. There are about 110,000 resident positions in the U.S., according to the AAMC. Teaching hospitals rely heavily on Medicare funding to pay for these slots. In 1997, Congress imposed a cap on funding for medical residencies, which hospitals say has increasingly hurt their ability to expand the number of positions.

One provision in the Health Care Reform bill attempts to address residencies. Since some residency slots go unfilled each year, the law will pool the funding for unused slots and redistribute it to other institutions, with the majority of these slots going to primary care or general surgery residencies. The slot redistribution will create additional residencies, because previously unfilled positions will now be used, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. It will probably take 10 years to even make a dent into the number of doctors that we need out there,” said Atul Grover, the AAMC’s chief advocacy officer.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Tube Feeding Depends On The Attitude Of The Facility

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

By the year 2030, the number of people in the United States over 65 will soar to 71.5 million. The healthcare industry is keeping pace by providing communities with the housing and care resources needed to accommodate the nation’s aging population. Independent, assisted living and memory care facilities are oftentimes located on the same property and are known as Continuing Care Retirement Communities.  At a CCRC, residents can move within the tiers as their conditions may change over the years. Many assisted living facilities are also stand alone homes that frequently have wings for providing memory care to those residents with loss of cognitive skills such as those with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia.

Tube feeding is a procedure used in acute care hospitals for patients recovering from certain surgeries, those with neurological problems, some going through intense chemotherapy or for any reason, are unable to receive proper nutrition by swallowing. Feeding tubes, or the medical term, Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy, (PEG), are frequently utilized to provide nutrition for the elderly. Many of these elderly patients reside in assisted living facilities and skilled nursing facilities. Though the procedure is fairly routine medically, there are many complex issues surrounding PEG use, particularly for patients near the end of life, where the decision to use or not to use a PEG is frequently made without the participation of the patient.

The ethical picture is further clouded by several studies that question the medical benefit of PEGs in elderly demented patients, a group that receives a high percentage of the PEG procedures currently done. Other studies have found a surprisingly high death rate for those patients within one month of a PEG insertion. Tube feeding has been shown to have no demonstrable benefit in assisted living or skilled nursing patients with advanced cognitive impairment, yet its use within this population reveals a striking and unexplained variation within the United States.

Half complete memory by *Jangmai on deviantART

The Journal of the American Medical Association has published a report on a study of patients with advanced cognitive impairment and found that 70% of feeding tube insertions were done in the acute care hospital prior to the patient being moved to an assisted living facility. The study suggests that higher insertion rates are associated with the following acute hospital factors:

For profit ownership vs. government owned
Larger size vs. smaller size (more than 310 beds vs. less than 101 beds)
A more aggressive approach to end of life care, meaning greater use of the intensive care unit in the last 6 months of life as opposed to a memory care facility or hospice.

A field study was also done in two South Carolina assisted living facilities. Field studies are based on the idea that humans are best understood to the fullest possible context if it includes the place where they live, the improvements they’ve made to that place, how they are making a living and providing food, housing, energy and water for themselves or others, what language(s) they speak and so on. The study revealed a startling variation in the culture of the organizations and its influence on attitudes toward tube feeding. Key features in assisted living facilities with low use of feeding tubes:

A more home like environment in which food, mealtimes, and family are central.
Administrative support in solving feeding problems.
Emphasis on the value of, and sufficient staff for hand feeding.
Family inclusion in decision making.

In contrast, the high use feeding tube facility had an impersonal, institutional atmosphere with strictly scheduled and poorly staffed mealtimes.  Staff attitudes favored tube feeding, and though the decision making process was not clear, it emphatically did NOT include family. If you are considering a Continuing Care Retirement Community or a standalone assisted living facility that most often includes a memory care wing for the cognitively impaired, it is essential to ask about their policy on tube feeding. Using an experienced, qualified referral service to assist you in the process, can help you determine the attitudes and policies of the organization where you or your loved one will reside.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Philadelphia and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

The Role Of Aging May Be Dispelled In Assisted Living Facilities

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

“Since it is the “other” within us who is old, it is natural that the revelation of our age should come to us from outside – from others.” -Simone de Beauvoir

The psychological axiom of the quote could be described as: what we think about a person influences how we will perceive them; how we perceive them influences how we will behave towards them; and how we behave toward them ultimately shapes who they are. So, on what basis do we think about older people?  Because of the social patterns of age segregation in our society, we are tracked through time with our age mates: in school, from kindergarten through high school and often college; in youth organizations, such as Cub Scouts through Eagle Scouts, the young and old rarely have meaningful interactions outside of the family.

A study by the Center on Aging at the University of Maryland found that children of all ages had limited knowledge and negative attitudes about old people. In fact, only 39 of the 180 children surveyed were able to name an older person they know outside of their family. As a result, the young are inclined to view the old stereotypically, and not to think about their own aging.  Each group has its own “social clock” for judging the age appropriateness of various role activities, such as the “right” time for getting married, starting a family, “peaking” in one’s career, or retiring. Together, these age linked stages of life provide the individual a standardized timetable by which they might gauge the “correctness” of their life trajectory in terms of being “on time.”

Good Old Love by *enkana on deviantART

Being creatures of comparison, people have a tendency to compare their present selves with their former selves along with stories of significant others when they were at a similar stage. The American public holds a consistent image of what it’s like to be old and what the typical older person is like. The consistency is important considering the old are the most heterogeneous of any age group since we all age differently biologically, psychologically, and sociologically. It is significant that the elderly share this same stereotype of themselves, even though many generally perceive themselves to be exceptions.

In an AARP survey, “Images of Aging in America,” 1,200 adults age 65 and older were asked to rate a series of problems people face based on two criteria: how it affects them personally and how they believe the problems affect other people over 65 years of age.  The percent of individuals age 65 and over who rated the perceived problem as very serious for themselves and others were as follows:
Fear of crime        37% for themselves and 69% for others over 65
Not enough money    12% for themselves and 55% for others over 65
Loneliness        6% for themselves and 46% for others over 65
Poor health        15% for themselves and 57% for others over 65
Being needed    8% for themselves and 41% for others over 65
Keeping busy:    4% for themselves and 26% for others over 65

The results are revealing, and somewhat encouraging. Although seniors may recognize that many in their same “social clock” age group may have problems they view as serious, they don’t seem to think of themselves as being that in that category. Perhaps the survey was conducted in a successful assisting living facility where residents are encouraged to drop the stereotypes and live life with zeal without dwelling on the problems associated with age!

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Phoenix and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Wii Video Game Rehabilitation For Seniors In Assisted Living

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

It is not an accident that Nintendo’s original name for their video game Revolution, evolved into simply and officially being, “Wii.” Nintendo of America’s President, Reggie Fils-Aime, put it this way when he said, “Revolution as a name is not ideal; it’s long, and in some cultures, it’s hard to pronounce. So we wanted something that was short, to the point, easy to pronounce, and distinctive. That’s how ‘Wii,’ as a console name, was created.” The company has given many reasons for this choice of name since the announcement, however, the best known is:

“Wii sounds like ‘we’, which emphasizes that the console is for everyone. Wii can easily be remembered by people around the world, no matter what language they speak, no confusion, no need to abbreviate, just Wii.” Nintendo’s spelling of “Wii” with two lower case “i” characters is meant to symbolize two people standing side by side, representing players gathering together. Playing Wii Sports and Fitness games has indeed become popular for everyone, including seniors in assisted living facilities.

Guinness World Records confirms a record was set in Houston, Texas at the largest ever, senior citizen Wii Bowling Tournament. The event was put on by TexanPlus, Houston’s largest Medicare HMO. The event drew more than 1,500 supporters and 600 senior bowlers determined to  break the record and also have fun while dishing out a bit of Texas style competition and a side helping of health information. The extravaganza included a health fair and immunization clinic. “I’m in it to win it,” one man at the event said as he rolled his walker up to the foul line.

Wii Wallpaper by *vinh291 on deviantART

According to a sponsor, one booty shakin’ grandma even showed off her victory dance after she “Wii bowled” a strike. Aside from the “seniors gone wild” moments, the event served a very important purpose: to encourage seniors to get stronger and more physically fit, possibly saving them from life altering injuries such as broken hips resulting from a falls. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of injury related death in seniors.

Assisted living facilities staff knows that a fall, or worse, a broken bone can limit a resident’s mobility and can be the downward spiral that can end up taking a life. The healthcare workers in assisted living facilities take steps to make sure their senior residents have a reduced risk of falling. They make sure their residents have regular vision checkups for changes that may impair depth perception. Sometimes medications can cause dizziness or disorientation and the resident’s doctor may recommend the use of a cane or walker to help prevent falls.

In assisted living facilities, objects that get in the way of walking are removed and handrails and night lights are installed in bathrooms. Assisted living facilities have regular exercise programs designed to help keep their residents mobile, flexible and healthy. A daily walk around the courtyard and garden area is a common activity of residents who choose assisted living facilities as a safe, comfortable place to spend their senior years. As for the Wii bowlers in Houston, all the participants, winners and runners up reported that they were happy they went to the event and found the video game system a fun and healthy way to get exercise.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Houston and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Sorting Out Family “Stuff” Before Moving Into An Assisted Living Home

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

In a recent conversation with a friend to catch up on what she had been doing lately, I was reminded of a familiar scenario that many people with retired elderly parents seem to go through. My friend related that she had spent the weekend out of town at her parent’s home helping them sort through some of their possessions. When I asked my friend if her elderly parents were planning to move, she said, “No, they just needed help organizing and disposing of some unnecessary items that had accumulated over the years.”

Many times, whether consciously or otherwise, many elderly people feel the need to begin “sifting” through all kinds of the unnecessary household paraphernalia that tend to amass over the course of a lifetime. David Ekerdt, the director of the Gerontology Center at the University of Kansas, decided to research the subject of “stuff,” with the help of funding from the National Institute on Aging and the assistance of colleagues at Wayne State University. Social workers, geriatricians and retirement community administrators seem to believe that the sheer volume of objects in a typical household, the enormous physical and cognitive effort involved in sorting out what’s essential, and the psychological toll of parting with what’s disposable, can lead to a kind of paralysis that keeps seniors in place, even when the “place” isn’t the best place.

Moving by *Static-Ending on deviantART

The premise is that possessions are an obstacle to people living where they can better manage their health and well being,” Dr. Ekerdt said. Maybe such undertakings are a subliminal effort by an elderly person to prune the belongings of their domain before the time comes when they can no longer physically lift, move and discard things themselves. They may also be preparing for the time Dr. Ekerdt described and they want to be in charge of the process. Moving into an independent or assisted living home is often times more of a relief for seniors than something to dread. When they make the decision to move from an apartment or sell their long time family home, having previously pared down all the paraphernalia they have collected, they often feel the relief of having a more simplified lifestyle.

Overcoming the obstacle and chore of paring down “stuff,” as Dr. Ekerdt describes it, is often a first step in moving on. According to an article published in the New York Times Blog on Aging, Dr. Ekerdt’s research, revealed that families frequently become part of the process helping their parents downsize, and they usually, “fall into two categories. They assist, or they assert.” The article states that, “acting as an assistant requires that the person in charge have the cognitive ability to make decisions without becoming confused or overwhelmed, even when someone else is supplying the muscle.” In such cases, this role “turns into the more paternalistic, assertive approach.”

“Family members take a stronger role and begin to preempt the elder’s own decisions, I think out of concern for the elder’s health and safety,” Dr. Ekerdt says in the article. It comes into play when a parent seems unwilling to throw anything away, or even to confront the need to. Or, when dementia has robbed him or her of the ability to make rational decisions. Dr. Ekerdt has seen adult children discarding “stuff” behind a parent’s back, figuring it won’t be needed. He’s also seen seniors retrieve things from the garbage afterward. “There can be exasperation and hurt feelings,” he said. “It can create sour memories.” But, in certain situations, it may be necessary. Other times however, the elderly parents are so eager to clear the hurdle and move onto a more carefree assisted living home, that the children become the ones who end up “rescuing” discarded items that hold family or childhood memories that are dear to them.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Los Angeles and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors Helping Seniors

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

The hair around his temples has gotten a little gray.  He doesn’t always react when you walk by because his hearing has gotten poor. His eyesight is slowly failing and oftentimes he doesn’t seem to notice you’re there. Some times when I watch him, he’s just staring off into space. He sits for hours in his favorite chair and when he gets up, he’s a little old man, arthritic and sore. His affection level is still high though, and he is always anxious to talk, but go for a walk, no way.  He just doesn’t have as much energy as he did when he was younger. He is a senior, a senior dog. Yet in spite of his aging, he is no less needed or loved by his family. Just as it does with humans, the aging process affects pets. Many times, as human seniors begin to slow down, they feel depressed and find it more difficult to find meaning in their lives.

Assisted living communities are home like atmospheres where many seniors are choosing to spend part of their retirement years.  They have as much independence as they want with the knowledge that personal care and support services are available if needed. The communities offer exercise, entertainment, activities and delicious meals and the opportunity to socialize and make new friends. There has been much success in independent and assisted living communities, nursing homes and hospitals when trained, therapy dogs visit with residents. Diane and David Pierce of St. Louis, Missouri, took it one step further. After spending several years working for animal rescues and fostering over sixty dogs, they decided to start an adoption service that specifically matched senior dogs with seniors still living in their homes. Senior Dogs 4 Seniors has three programs to accommodate both the needs of the senior dog and the senior owner’s capability for caring for them. They have set up charities and volunteer programs to carry out the services

an old man and his dog by *Heinay on deviantART

A – Adoption
Clients are asked to pay a one-time adoption fee.
B – Basic Care
The basic care plan includes routine veterinary care and grooming services. Their volunteers will pick up the dog and take them to the vet or groomer and return them to the owner
C – Complete Care
The complete care plan includes routine veterinary care and grooming services as well as a monthly visit to deliver dog food, medications, heartworm preventatives, flea and tick preventatives. The plan also covers trimming the dog’s nails and cleaning up the yard.

There are a number of reasons that so many older dogs find themselves without homes. The top reasons for dogs being relinquished to animal shelters include:
Moving – Landlord issues – Cost of pet maintenance – No time for pet – Inadequate facilities – Too many pets in home – Pet illness – Personal problems – Biting

Senior Dogs 4 Seniors evaluate the dogs and the needs of the seniors who will be adopting them prior to the adoption placement.
What it means to the dogs:
It is difficult to find homes for senior dogs and they are often put to sleep because no one has time for them. Older pets make great companions, especially for seniors. The majority of older pets are already housebroken, have been trained to walk on a leash, and are calmer and more settled in life.
What it means to the people:
Pets Lower Blood Pressure. A study of healthy patients showed that people over 40 who own pets have lower blood pressure than people who do not have pets. Another study showed that talking to pets decreased blood pressure.

Fewer Trips to the Doctor. Seniors who own dogs go to the doctor less often than those who do not. In a study of 1,000 Medicare patients, even the most highly stressed dog owner/guardians in the study had 21 percent fewer physician contacts than non dog owner/guardians.
Less Depression. Studies show that seniors with pets do not become depressed as often as those without pets.
Easier to Make Friends. Seniors with pets meet more people and like to talk about their pets.
Seniors become More Active. Seniors with pets go for more walks and are generally more active than those without pets.
Pets are Friends. Most everyone, but especially seniors, will say that pets are their friends.
Pets Ease Loss. Elderly people who suffer the loss of a spouse and own a pet are less likely to experience deterioration in health following that stressful event.
Pets Fight Loneliness. You are less likely to be lonely with a canine friend around.
Seniors Take Better Care of Themselves. Seniors take good care of their pets and better care of themselves when they own a pet.
A Sense of Security. Pets help seniors to feel that someone they trust is always around.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living San Jose and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

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