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Seniors In Assisted Living Communities Have Great Opportunity For Friendship

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

When poet, Ralph Waldo Emerson, was quoted as saying, “He who has a thousand friends has not a friend to spare, and he who has one enemy will meet him everywhere,” I doubt he was imagining the modern day Facebook phenomenon of literally having thousands of “virtual friends.” It is more likely he was romanticizing about the value of real friendships in our lives. Making friends can be costly, according to behavioral ecologists. While it might not be a very romantic view of friendship, making new friends involves an investment by committing time and energy to another person in the hope that they will provide reciprocal benefits in the future.

Dr. Will Reader of Sheffield Hallam University says online networks are somehow reducing the investment necessary to make new friends by lowering the perceived risk. His online survey, which forms the main part of his ongoing research, has revealed that face to face encounters are, not unsurprisingly, still the most important factor in close friendships. According to Dr. Reader, the importance placed on face to face encounters is a result of the necessity to base an investment on honest information. “The importance of honest signals is a fundamental concept in behavioral ecology. For example, the female songbird invests in a mate based on the quality of his voice, as this is an honest signal indicating the fitness of the bird. In the same way, people choose friends based on their ‘quality’, and this can only be assessed when there are honest signals being given,” says Dr. Reader.

James and Bea by *Dtellesen on deviantART

While using the computer to “network,” share written words, thoughts and photos can provide many tech savvy seniors the opportunity to stay in touch with not only “virtual friends,” family and the more traditional type of pals, it doesn’t seem to be enough. Researchers at Brigham Young University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that people with strong social connections live longer than those without. Their studies suggest that social isolation is as much a risk factor for mortality as the more frequently cited reasons such as smoking and obesity.
The basic logic is that friends stimulate the brain and force people to get out and interact with others. Many times elderly people experience social isolation and loneliness as they age and when family and friend networks become smaller. Social contacts usually decrease after retirement and may continue to decline with the deaths of family members and friends and changes in residence following widowhood, mobility difficulties and ill health.

Social isolation is defined as being separated from one’s environment to the point of having few satisfying and rewarding relationships. Loneliness, on the other hand, is one’s feeling of dissatisfaction with social contacts in terms of quantity of contacts, quality of relationships or both.
Social isolation and loneliness have consistently been found to be associated with health. Declining physical health may lead to social isolation and associated feelings of loneliness. Perceived loneliness is one of the strongest predictors of health. Loneliness has also been found to be associated with diabetes, heart disease, ulcers, respiratory conditions, headache, low back pain and abdominal pain. Perceptions of intimate, personal relationships affect feelings of physical and emotional health. People who are not lonely may have a more positive view of their relationships, accept aging and its changes and therefore feel happier and healthier. Research has shown that people in poor health coupled with high anxiety tend to feel more isolated and lonely.

Other studies have shown that elderly people in declining health who feel socially isolated and lonely are more likely to move to a senior residence or an assisted living community. Such moves frequently increase their social participation and delay further health decline. A comment by Janice E. Brown, an end of life, hospice chaplain in Orange, CA, summarized the trials of aging most it eloquently when she said, “Sometimes death is not the most difficult. It is the ‘little dyings’ of aging that are the most difficult.” Residents of assisted living communities are considerably less likely to experience isolation and loneliness. Not only do the communities have planned activities and group centered, family style mealtimes, they also provide residents with a relaxed, worry free setting where they have the opportunity to develop genuine interest in others that result in intimate friendships. Ralph Waldo Emerson went one step further on the subject of friendship when he said, “A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of nature.”

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors In Assisted Living Communities Are Knitting Their Way To Patriotism

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

A summer time visit to a local county fair with our grandson who was visiting from out of state, turned into a bit of a lesson on patriotism. After visiting the large livestock section lined with rows and rows of domesticated pigs and cattle, as spectators at the ‘Mutton Bustin’ event where children under age 6 try to ride sheep for more than 6 seconds,  my family ended up at one of our favorites, the rodeo event.  What could be more “American” than that? Before standing for the singing of our national anthem, spectators were treated to a fly over single engine plane from which a hang glider jumped out carrying an enormous American flag. The jumper was good. Despite the wind, using precision maneuvers he appeared from the clouds while simultaneously unveiling the red, white and blue in full glory, before landing smack in the middle of the arena.

It was an emotional, impressive display. Too bad the rodeo announcer ruined the spirit of patriotism and national pride shortly thereafter by making a joke about our president over the announcing system.  I made the comment to my grandson that it was too bad the event planners had incorporated so much patriotism into the event and then….., he finished my sentence by saying, “and then, ‘dissing’ the President of the United States.” The incident seemed contradictory and not a course of study in Patriotism 101. Fortunately, there are seniors around the country who are the real role models for what patriotism is about. Seniors in assisted living centers in Coral Gables, Florida, the mile high city of Denver, Colorado and in all corners of our nation are knitting their way to patriotism.

Inaguration 2009: Patriotic by *Photographiq on deviantART

One of them is quoted as saying, “Though we all have differing opinions about war and politics, we’re not conflicted about our soldiers – who stand up for our country every day. Knitting for Our Troops is a great way to say how much we care for our service men and women.” The senior groups are knitting and crocheting helmet liners and hats for the U.S. troops stationed or leaving for overseas duty around the world, and especially those stationed in Afghanistan. Wintertime temperatures in parts of the country reach below zero numbers. Senior centers, independent and assisted living communities around our nation regularly engage their residents in meaningful activities that offer them the opportunity to contribute to important causes. If you are searching for an assisted living home for yourself or a loved one, using an experienced referral service is a good first step in locating a community that will meet your social needs.

Trivia Note:  Children participating in “Mutton Bustin” events wear ice hockey helmets, face guards and protective vests. The aim of the game is to hold onto a 180 lb. Colombian ewe for up to six seconds after being released from a gate into a 150 foot long run.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors Get Emotional First Aid In Assisted Living Communities

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

It was around six in the morning when she burst into our room. With tears streaming down her cheeks and a look of fear and sheer panic on her face, my mother, who just the night before had returned from vacation with us, informed us that, “New York city is being bombed, that fighter jets were flying over the city.” Of course, it was September 11, 2001 and although the facts streaming from her radio were not interpreted completely accurately, they began to unfold a series of horrific events that 9 years later still causes goose bumps. The hours, days, weeks and years that followed this horrid, hate filled atrocity left emotional scars that still haunt so many people today.

Sadly, natural, accidental and planned disasters happen around the world all of the time. Most news reports focus on the environmental devastation, physical illness, injury and death, while long term emotional distress takes a back seat as the headlines fade. The New England Journal of Medicine writes that, ”as the recent Deepwater Horizon oil disaster enters its next phase, consensus is emerging that among its most profound immediate health effects are those on the emotional and psychosocial health of Gulf Coast communities.”  “State mental health and substance abuse agencies report an increase in emotional distress and demand for assistance. Calls to domestic violence hotlines are increasing.  Fishermen fear for their families’ economic future, and communities wonder how the influx of cleanup workers and volunteers will affect their way of life.”

Davy in Therapy by *warrioronlydude on deviantART

Most major disasters, including the Exxon Valdez spill, Hurricane Katrina, and the 9/11 attacks, have been followed by increases in the prevalence of mental illness, domestic violence, and substance abuse.1,2 Emotional distress manifests itself at increased rates of driving while intoxicated, theft, domestic violence and assault. Many independent and assisted living communities help their residents in dealing with the psychological and emotional responses to national or world disasters by organizing discussion groups. People of all ages and from all walks of life are affected by horrific events, but sometimes the elderly feel more isolated when disaster strikes.  Symptoms such as apathy; a sense of hopelessness; recurrent somatic complaints; and excessive irritability and anger frequently appear long after the media clips disappear.

After disaster strikes, assisted living communities frequently arrange for guest speakers from state and local agencies and community based organizations that can offer psychological first aid. They are trained to address emotional distress, build coping skills, connect people with support services, and promote a return to normal routine, as well as counseling and psychiatric services if necessary.
The immediate community based discussion groups give residents the chance to express and share their fears, concerns and feelings of sadness.  The groups also encourage residents to ask questions but in most instances, just having the opportunity to share their feelings with others and realize they are not alone, helps them in the healing process.

References:
1S Galea, CR Brewin, M Gruber, Exposure to hurricane-related stressors and mental illness after Hurricane Katrina. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2007;64:1427-1434
2LA Palinkas, MA Downs, JS Petterson, J RussellSocial, cultural, and psychological impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill.. Hum Organ 1993;52:1-13

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors Feeling The Need To Feel Needed

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

Often senior citizens, especially those with declining mobility and loss of independence often find themselves feeling less than worthy contributing members of society.  Time and time again, I’ve heard it, “I wish I could do more to help.” From my own personal experience, I can say with certainty, it’s very difficult for an elderly family member to ask for help. When roles are reversed between parents and children, it can be an emotionally charged, awkward time, especially when a huge part of the parents’ happiness has been derived from having the capability of “giving” or helping their child. Although not for everyone, and certainly not without the advice from their physician, there is way for seniors to give, and in a big way! About 4,000,000 persons in the United States will need blood this year, which corresponds to one person every 12 seconds.

Who Can Donate Blood? You must be at least 17 years old to donate to the general blood supply, or 16 years old with parental/guardian consent, if allowed by state law. According to the American Red Cross, there is no upper age limit for blood donation as long as you are well with no restrictions or limitations to your activities. All donors must be in good health. You can still donate if you are taking medication although it depends on your state of health and the type of medication.
Who cannot donate blood? Some people may be deferred from donating blood temporarily or permanently.

World Blood Donor Day logo by *KeeperOfTheGreyGates on deviantART

Some of these reasons are:
Temporarily Deferred:
People who
Have had a heart attack in the last six to twelve months.
Have had malaria in the last three years.
Have visited areas where malaria is found in the last year.
Have received blood, plasma or other types of components in the last year.
Have been tattooed in the last year.
Have had cardiac surgery in the last year or those who have not completely recuperated from the surgery and who are taking cardiovascular medicine.
Have been exposed to someone with hepatitis within the last year.
Are not feeling well the day of the blood donation.
Have taken antibiotics within the last 24 to 72 hours.
Women who are pregnant or have had an abortion in the last 6 weeks are temporarily deferred.

Permanently Deferred:
People who
Have had hepatitis at age eleven or older.
Have received chemotherapy or radiation for the treatment of cancer.
Are at high risk of contracting the HIV virus/AIDS.
Due to current concerns with bovine spongiform encephalopathy and new variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, blood centers are deferring donors who spent any cumulative period of 3 or more months in the United Kingdom from 1980 through 1996. Please consult your regional blood center regarding other possible deferral policies.

Aspects, other than the age of each potential donor’s health history are discussed as part of the donation process before any blood is collected. Each donor receives a brief examination during which temperature, pulse, blood pressure and hemoglobin are measured.
What to Expect in the Procedure:
The procedure is done by a skilled, specially trained technician and takes 5 to 10 minutes. You will rest and be served refreshments. Plan to spend about 35 to 45 minutes at the blood drive. The procedure is relatively painless other than a little sting when the needle is inserted, but no pain during the donation. One pint of blood volume or plasma is replaced within 24 hours. Red cells need about 4 to 8 weeks for complete replacement. Most people feel just fine after the procedure.  Donors who know what to expect and have eaten regular meals before donating are fine. After donating, drink extra fluids for the next 24 hours.

The Benefits of Donating Blood
Your blood can make a difference between an adequate supply of blood reserves or a shortage. Donations usually drop off during summer months and current supplies are needed. I can’t think of anything more satisfying for a healthy senior citizen wanting the experience of feeling needed, than having the opportunity to “give the gift of life.”

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors Dance Their Way To Health And Happiness

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

One young audience member said, “Adults should stop dancing after the typical college years, around age 22 or 23.”  Undoubtedly, many young people have claimed a state of embarrassment after seeing their baby boomer parents dancing up a storm at a family wedding reception or special event. Decades of research however, show that friendship circles that include dancing reduce stress, boost self esteem and ease anxiety about aging. Friends can be particularly beneficial for seniors because peers often share medical tips and encourage one another to stay healthy. Fifty three year old, Deborah McVay, decided to start dancing after having an aneurysm, heart attack and stroke all in the course of a year. Her doctors told her that if she survived, she would not be able to walk or talk again. Apparently, she made a pact with God that if she could ever move again, she would start dancing.

Many aging baby boomers haven’t had to experience health events as extreme as McVay did, but they’re finding that dancing not only has physical health benefits but is great for morale. Independent, retirement and assisted living communities already know that exercise and 70s disco is a winning combination. Many incorporate dancercise classes into their health and fitness programs as a way for residents to have fun while getting the physical benefits as well. McVay took her love of dancing one step further when she started the dance troop, Sassie Seniors out of Memphis, TN. She claims she has an alter ego, “Deyonce,” in admiration her younger counterpart, Beyonce. McVay and the eleven other members of the dance group get a chance to tap into their inner Beyonce with bounces, pops and shakes on stage. As the women perfect their struts and slides, youngsters frequently peak inside their rehearsals to watch the dancing divas who are young at heart.

dancing happy couple by *fahrmboy-stock on deviantART

The kids who frequent the South Memphis center look up to the Sassies, said group member Geneva “Soul Diva” Johnson, who is 50. “I think it lets children know that age ‘ain’t’ nothing but a number,” said Johnson. “We are living our life like it’s golden and cherishing each moment that we’re here.” Strutting in fishnet stockings and four inch heels, the ladies are regular performers at political events and charity fundraisers. They have also served as the halftime act at some high school jamborees and also perform liturgical dances.  However, it is the over 50 troupe’s tribute to Beyonce that is most popular. “The crowd goes wild because the first thing that people say is that they can’t believe that the older people are showing up the younger people,” said McVay.
Proving that baby boomers can still find the beat is the group’s gift to the world. Their enduring friendship is the Sassies’ gift to themselves. The women celebrate each other’s milestones at monthly dinners. The group supports their “sisters” during life’s challenging moments.

The Sassie Seniors are a great example of how embracing the aging process and taking   health issues into stride can make a positive difference in the quality of one’s life. Many boomers entering their retirement years may start experiencing some of the slow downs that come naturally with age, but it doesn’t mean they have to stop having fun. Many aging seniors in assisted living communities have conditions that require some assistance or extra help with some of life’s daily activities.  The extra support and security provided in assisted living allows them to participate in fun activities and enjoy life. As a Sassie Diva might say, “Chill and rock out.”

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Senior Citizen Risks Danger To Continue Lifelong Pursuit

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

Several times a week, the 74 year old grandmother drives from her home in El Paso, TX into the murder capital of the world to help keep a sanctuary for its citizens alive. Many senior citizens around the world find personal satisfaction by staying active and involved in causes that are meaningful to them. Independent and assisted living communities around the nation not only offer leisure activities to their residents, but expose them to many educational opportunities that can lead them to the discovery of new interests and pursuits. This fall, CNN’s Heroes of 2010 revealed Guadalupe Arizpe De La Vega as one of the top 10 nominated this year for their outstanding humanitarian services. Arizpe De La Vega founded the Hospital de la Familia, a health center more than 30 years ago.

The center in Juarez, Mexico, cares for about 900 people daily, regardless of their ability to pay. Despite the escalating violence in the city, the 74 year old senior travels there several times a week to make sure residents get the care they need. Guadalupe Arizpe De La Vega insists on returning to her hometown to preserve the center, saying, “It’s very, very important to keep that place open, giving good services” to the people of Juarez. “Because it’s their hope.” Her journey from El Paso to Juarez has seared some painful images into her mind. “We were going under a bridge and there was a body upside down without a head, hanging there with all the blood flowing,” she recalls. “It was something like a horror movie.” Such sights have become increasingly common in Juarez, as Mexico’s drug war has intensified. Nearly 2,000 people have been killed so far this year, including 34 members of the municipal police. That is in addition to the 2,623 deaths last year and 1,908 deaths in 2007-08.

Gun Control by *matt- on deviantART

Despite the violence, De La Vega’s hospital and its staff — which treats about 900 patients daily, regardless of their ability to pay — have remained unharmed. “Our hospital has not been touched. Our doctors have not been kidnapped. This is a miracle of God, believe me,” she says. “Everybody knows that it’s a safe place for healing, for loving, for empowering people. Why would they be against that? We have been working there for 37 years with the community,” she says. “We don’t turn anybody away.” De La Vega, who is married to a prominent businessman from Juarez, lived there for decades, but the escalating violence, murder, crime and corruption recently forced her to move to El Paso. She says the tipping point came when her family was threatened. “They called and they said that they had kidnapped my daughter. They wanted us to send the money, but my daughter came into the room while we were talking to them. More than anything I wanted to protect my three children,” she says. De La Vega says she has lost friends and neighbors in the conflicts, but she insists she’s not afraid and she’s determined to help the people of Juarez continue receiving the medical care they need.

De La Vega has always been passionate about health care, volunteering with the Red Cross when she was 8 years old. She became an advocate for maternal and infant health in the early 1970s after reading a newspaper article about an impoverished mother of nine, pregnant with her 10th child, who tried to kill her fetus by stabbing herself in the stomach. For De La Vega, who frequently visits patients and is active in administrative, operational and financial aspects at the hospital, her work not only saves lives but has given meaning to her own life as well. “I just love it. Because it’s my life, it’s my passion. I get the privilege of experiencing the magic moment of change from sickness to health, from darkness to light, from apathy to enthusiasm. This is what gives me meaning to my life.”

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors In Assisted Living Save The Art Of Letter Writing

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

According to the United States Postal Service, mail volume is projected to fall to 150 billion in 2020, representing a 37 percent decline in first class mail alone. Revenue contributed by first class mail will decline from its current 51 percent to about 35 percent by 2020. In order to close the gap on a projected $238 billion shortfall during the next 10 years, the USPS has proposed an aggressive plan to cut costs that includes a possible rate increase in 2011 and canceling Saturday mail delivery. Postmaster General John E. Potter said the plan, known as “Ensuring a Viable Postal Service for America,” could save the USPS as much as $123 billion.

There are a number of reasons for the decline in “snail mail,” as it has come to be known. Most people do their banking and pay bills online, merchants advertise on the Internet, people read magazines and newspapers on the publisher’s online version, and bury themselves in entire novels using cellular networks on electronic devices such as Kindle. A bittersweet reason the snail mail volume is down is perhaps because many people no longer exchange personal letters these days.
Most of us have become so addicted to instant communication that the very idea of writing someone a letter seems as ancient as an eight track tape. Even the speed of text messages and emails isn’t fast enough for some people, giving rise to a host of abbreviations that emanate the codes of a secret society.

letter by *CoverMeInGasoline on deviantART

Whether we realize it or not, there is a great danger in the loss of the letter writing as an art. The handwritten letter is personal because it requires more thought, more time, and some creativity.
Many seniors who have come to recognize the benefits of being tech savvy still seem to enjoy exchanging letters with family members or old friends. Assisted living residents, children, those lonely and isolated as well as baby boomers enjoy receiving letters. My letter writing exchange has dwindled down to having only one genuine pen pal, a sister who lives in another city. Both of us are computer savvy and regularly exchange emails, but they are short and lack some of the insight we scribe in our hand written letters. Somehow, they feel more intimate and private.

After sending my pen pal a letter, I look forward to opening the mailbox and finding her return mail where she comments on what I wrote and gives me new insight into what is going on in her life.
Enjoying the art of letter writing does not diminish the value of technology, which I often times think our society, myself included, could not live without. Between work and home, a normal day includes a good nine or ten hours sitting in front of a computer screen. The Internet consistently amazes by providing valuable information instantly at the keystrokes of my fingertips.
There is hardly a more convenient, faster way of relating and documenting information than in an email. Texting from our cell phones also has its benefits especially if done in a setting where confidentiality is an issue.

Facebook wall posts and Tweets are quick ways of sharing information with “friends” or “followers,” even if you don’t really know them. The negative of Twitter is that it can become a one way street of communication, if with hesitation, I might call it that. Fellow tweeters only see your updates if he or she chooses to follow you. Whatever social network you use to transmit short bits of information such as telling the world that you’re eating a bologna sandwich, standing in line at the DMV, or watching your neighbor through the window as they pick up dog doo off your front lawn, the results are not likely to carry much sentimental, or even informational weight.

There is a definite irony as I type an article that people I have never met will read on the Internet. It is not likely that it will be printed or filed away for perusing again later. It is likely however, that if read, it will be along with hundreds of others throughout the course of a day. Although most embrace the value of technology, it is burdensome knowing that we may become the first generation in history to leave no written record of ourselves. Children may never learn cursive handwriting, no one will find him or herself in a museum standing five Plexiglas inches away from a document like the Magna Carta and people may never experience the joy of plopping down on the couch and reading a letter from a loved one.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

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