High Cholesterol And Blood Pressure May Affect Memory In Middle Age

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Most middle agers and seniors attempt to keep their cholesterol and blood pressure levels under control in an attempt to decrease the risk of heart attack and stroke, but a new study shows more may be at stake. In a long term study of British civil servants, a team of researchers in France assessed data on about 3,500 British men and 1,300 British women with an average age of 55. Over the course of ten years, participants were measured three times for reasoning skills, memory, fluency and vocabulary.

Reasoning Test: Included 65 verbal and math questions that increased in difficulty.
Memory Test: Asked participants to recall a list of 20 words.
Fluency/Vocabulary Test: Asked people to do things such as name as many words that start with the letter “s” as they can in one minute or name as many animals as they can in the same period.

Participants were also given what is called a Framingham risk score, which takes into account a person’s age, gender, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, smoking history and diabetes status to predict the chances of having a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problem sometime within the next 10 years. According to the test results, it was observed that those with poor cardiovascular health were more likely to do poorly on memory and mental ability tests. Study co-author, Sara Kaffasian, a doctoral student at Paris’ French National Institute of Health and Medical Research said, “We found that cardiovascular risk in middle age is related to lower overall cognitive function. We also observed a relationship between poor cardiovascular scores and overall cognitive decline over 10 years.” The study results will to be presented in April at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in Honolulu. Experts caution that research presented at meetings is not subject to the same rigorous scrutiny given to research published in medical journals. Dr. Ralph Sacco, president of the American Heart Association, said an increasing body of research is showing the importance of cardiovascular health in maintaining brain function over a person’s life span.

“The link between cardiovascular health and brain health is becoming increasingly important and recognized,” said Sacco, a professor of neurology, epidemiology and human genetics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. High blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, high cholesterol and inactivity can contribute to a narrowing of the large blood vessels throughout the body, but also the small blood vessels of the brain, Sacco explained. Those changes can reduce blood flow, which can “starve the brain of oxygen and lead to changes in thinking, cognition and our mental abilities,” he said. Though the people in the study did not have Alzheimer’s, other research suggests that hypertension, diabetes and poor cardiovascular health are a risk factor for both Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia, he added. But the good news, he said, is that middle aged adults can take preventative steps to improve cardiovascular health by eating a proper diet, exercising, controlling diabetes if they have it and, if applicable, taking the correct medications for hypertension, Sacco said. “There is a hopeful note, which is that by controlling your vascular risk factors, you may be able to reduce or forestall cognitive decline,” he said.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care New York, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Facilities and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Creativity & Alzheimer’s Disease

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Alzheimer’s disease leads to nerve cell death and tissue loss throughout the brain. Over time, the brain shrinks dramatically, affecting nearly all of its functions. Alzheimer’s ultimately affects all parts of the brain but each person is affected differently as the disease progresses. In part, this is due to the nature and extent of damage being caused to different areas of the brain. Each section of the brain is known as a lobe; a lobe simply means a part of an organ. Because the portion of the brain that deals with creativity is often one of the last portions of the brain that is affected by Alzheimer’s disease, providing creative outlets for those affected in an important activity. In the earliest stages, before symptoms can be detected with testing, plaques and tangles, which are the hallmarks of the disease, begin to form in brain areas involved in:

Learning and memory
Thinking and planning

In the mild to moderate stages, brain regions develop more plaques and tangles than were present in early stages. As a result, individuals develop problems with memory or thinking serious enough to interfere with work or daily life. They may also get confused and have trouble handling money, expressing themselves and organizing their thoughts. Many people with Alzheimer’s disease are first diagnosed in this stage.

Plaques and tangles also spread to areas involved in:
Speaking and understanding speech
Sense of where your body is in relation to objects

In the advanced stages of Alzheimer’s disease, most of the cortex is seriously damaged. The cerebral cortex is a sheet of neural tissue that is the outermost part of the brain. It plays a key role in memory, attention, perception, thought, language and consciousness. During this stage of the disease, the brain shrinks dramatically due to widespread cell death. Individuals lose their ability to communicate, to recognize family and loved ones and to care for themselves. The right hemisphere of the brain is associated with the creative process. It conveys feeling, imagination, symbols and images in the present and future. It processes philosophical & religious beliefs, special perception, form and abstract thoughts. Alzheimer’s disease has a profound impact on creativity. Alzheimer’s disease attacks the right posterior part of the brain, which enables people to retrieve internal imagery and copy images. Alzheimer’s disease patients may lose the ability to copy images entirely. However, people with Alzheimer’s disease can continue to produce art by using their remaining strengths, such as color or composition instead of shapes or realism.

Dr. Luis Fornazzari, a researcher from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and the University of Toronto and clinical director of the Multilingual/Multicultural Memory Clinic believes the association between creativity and mental illness is an area worth exploring.
As part of his research, Dr. Fornazzari began studying the life of an artist who is suffering from  Alzheimer’s disease. Danae Chambers was commissioned to paint portraits of dignitaries around Canada and abroad. Her artwork has been shown in galleries around the world. Because of her disease, Ms. Chambers had a dramatic deterioration of communication, memory and life skills, but she could still paint beautifully. Traditionally, the approach in treating Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias focused on what is not functioning in the patient, such as memory loss and difficulties with daily life and communication. By focusing on abilities instead of cognitive deficits, Dr. Fornazzari is pioneering a new approach in the treatment of Alzheimer disease and related dementia.  “The distinctiveness of Danae Chambers’ story is that while examining her, we concentrated on the positive aspects of what was still functioning in her brain, such as her creative ability,” says Dr. Fornazzari. Many times patients in the advanced stages of the disease are isolated and have no means of any form of communication. The study suggests that quality of life is improved when patients are given the opportunity to express themselves in any form and it provides scientists an avenue to explore brain function.

The artists’ cognitive abilities were evaluated at four years, two years before and two years after the time she was admitted to a long term care facility in Toronto. Dr. Fornazzari monitored how her creativity emerged during the progressive course of the disease, while her other cognitive functions such as attention, working memory, and language ability increasingly deteriorated.  “Ms. Chambers’ case clearly demonstrates that the brain uses separate neural pathways for creative expression compared to neural networks used for speech, memory and attention,” says Dr. Fornazzari. “This is of profound importance to further understand and explore why Alzheimer’s disease preferentially attacks one neural pathway over the other.”  Dr. Fornazzari strongly advocates that creativity in any of its forms, either visual, musical, literary or performing arts should be actively explored in relation to patients with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, especially when their other cognitive functions do not allow caregivers and specialists to communicate with sufferers of the disease. This effort to focus on the preserved creative functions, instead of deficits of the patient, will improve their quality of life and is a rewarding way for caregivers to communicate with them. The findings of this scientific case study are published in the June issue of European Journal of Neurology.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care Dallas, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Facilities and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Clinical Progress For Alzheimer’s Detection

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Doctors can usually determine if a patient has dementia, and around 90 percent of the time they can accurately identify whether the dementia is due to Alzheimer’s disease. This diagnoses however, usually takes place after the disease has profoundly affected the brain and is causing severe symptoms. At this point in time, Alzheimer’s can only be diagnosed with complete accuracy after death, when microscopic examination of the brain reveals the characteristic plaques and tangles of the disease. In early April, The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association issued a new set of guidelines that categorize Alzheimer’s disease into three stages:
A phase when dementia has already developed and mental dysfunction is apparent.
A middle phase in which mild problems emerge but daily functions can still be performed.
The most recently discovered phase, in which no symptoms are evident but changes are taking place in the brain and are manifested by alterations of certain biomarkers (measurable substances in the blood or spinal fluid correlated with the disease) or in imaging studies such as MRI or PET scans.

This clarification is especially important since there are currently no drugs available that can effectively halt or significantly delay the onset of symptoms, although a few of the approved drugs can slow progression of the disease for a few months in a minority of patients. Currently, cerebral spinal fluid analyses and brain scans test for abnormal levels of the proteins beta-amyloid and tau, or shrinkage of certain brain areas, respectively. These tests, however, are still under investigation and are not yet reliably predictive for definite diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, except in advanced cases. The use of biomarkers in Alzheimer’s dementia and mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s was also proposed as a research agenda only, and is not intended for application in clinical settings at this time.

William Thies, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association Chief Medical and Scientific Officer said, “It is our hope that incorporating scientific knowledge gained and technological advances made over the past quarter century will improve current diagnosis, bring the field closer to earlier detection and treatment and, ultimately, lead to effective disease-modifying therapies.” He added that the “Development and publication of these articles is a major landmark in the field. That said, publication of these articles is not yet the end of the process of developing new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s, but is another major step in the process.” The ultimate goal is to identify reliable biomarkers that will accurately predict the eventual development of Alzheimer’s. “The sooner we can get such indicators, the more likely we’ll be able to interfere with the disease’s progress, especially when we develop effective new pharmaceutical treatments,” says ACSH’s Dr. Gilbert Ross. “Building such a database of research will hopefully break the chain of events that, at this point, irrevocably lead to Alzheimer’s. Hopefully, we’ll be able to break this chain within ten years or less, when the pathogenesis is more clearly delineated and focused drug interventions will be accelerated.”

800Seniors is a distinguished nationwide Senior Healthcare referral service. They are based in Southern California, located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors offers seniors citizens a range of different health care options. Based upon their needs they can opt for Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Care Homes Phoenix and Assisted Living nationwide. 800Seniors makes life easier by taking away the confusion and hassle. For more information about 800Seniors call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Caring Gracefully for Family Members With Dementia

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

A few nights ago, while tossing and turning in bed, too restless to quiet my mind and fall asleep, my husband stirred beside me. I told him I couldn’t sleep. His answer? “Why don’t you get up and go in the other room?” When I lamented that I was hoping he would comfort me, he rephrased his advice as such, “Why don’t you get up and go in the other room, sweetie?” Grrr, what a jerk I thought, but said nothing and turned over. Then I think of my elderly mother, the way she mixes everything up, and doesn’t believe me when I tell her something. I consider myself a patient person, especially with children (because they haven’t yet learned better) and the elderly, but when it comes to family members, I’m not so sure. Often times, many of us seem to reserve a large part our saintly patience and courteous behavior for total strangers.

How would you rate yourself?
On a scale of 1-10 (10 being saintly), how patient are you?
Do you extend the same grace, mercy, and forgiveness to your own family as you do to strangers and co-workers?
Are you more patient with children or the elderly?

If your honest answers to these questions touch a nerve, it may indicate that you are not a good candidate for becoming the sole caregiver of your elderly parents, particularly when the signs of dementia begin to appear. Of course, most of us feel justifiably responsible for helping our elderly parents and treating all of our loved ones with the same patience and respect we afford strangers, and when we struggle with doing so, most of us make an effort to improve. In trying to understand the phenomena, maybe we grow too accustomed to the unconditional love family members provide. We come to depend on their support, understanding, insight and guidance on everything from inconsequential day-to-day events, to important topics such as safety or a family crisis. When our family members don’t come through in a way we expect, albeit from the sleepy stupor such as was with my husband, or the devastating, gradual loss of cognitive skills in the case of my mother, we feel hurt and disappointed. We are insulated from hurt inflected by strangers because we lack a heightened level of intimacy with them.

Understanding the intrinsic layers of decline that accompanies dementia and its effect on a human being may provide us with the knowledge to help us deal with it  our elderly family members more gracefully. The Alzheimer’s Association regularly distributes articles that provide insight for helping family members and outside caregivers deal with those affected by the disease. A recent one, published in the Huffington Post, says, “It is so easy to think that there is no one there anymore when the person in front of you does not talk, or when they make unintelligible sounds, or say things that don’t seem to make sense, or don’t remember what happens from one minute to the next.” Although it may be a normal reaction, talking as if the person is not there or addressing them as you would a child and assuming that your interactions with them do not matter, can create an even more frustrating situation.
The article offered eight truths to help change the way we relate to persons with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.
The fact that the person doesn’t speak does not mean that they do not hear or understand.

No matter how withdrawn or unresponsive aperson may appear, one should act and speak as if they were completely cognizant. This precludes talking about the person in front of them, or ignoring their presence, or using language that is disrespectful. The person should be treated as we want to be treated, only using simpler language and talking more slowly so as to maximize the chances of being understood. Not recalling facts does not mean that the heart does not know or does not remember. To the contrary, persons with forgetfulness are extremely attuned to the quality of their relationships, and carry with them the emotional imprint of prior interactions, whether positive or negative. A parent may not remember that you called them earlier, but the positive effect of the phone conversation could linger for hours afterwards. The loss of abilities, no matter how severe, does not mean that all abilities are lost. Research shows that the following abilities remain, even into advanced stages of dementia: experiencing pride, maintaining dignity, experiencing shame and embarrassment, feeling concern for others, communicating feelings with assistance, maintaining self-esteem and manifesting spiritual awareness. What appears as nonsensical behavior actually makes a lot of sense from the person’s perspective.

Making sounds can be a desperate way of soothing oneself in the face of extreme alienation. Pacing is a way to channel one’s anxiety or boredom. Wandering can be viewed as a search for something missing, like one’s old home, or a lost sense of connection. Crying out is a plea for help. Aggressive gestures are expression of anger from one’s needs not being met adequately, or from one’s frustrations with the many losses attached with the Alzheimer’s or dementia experience. These behaviors are attempts to cope with very real distress. The person is not a child or a baby, although some of their behaviors may cause us to treat them that way.
The person may need assistance with basic activities such as eating, getting dressed, taking a shower and grooming, or they may engage in pre-verbal modes of communication –  behaviors that we normally associate with very young children. But they are not children. They are adults, with years of experience and accumulated wisdom, much of it stored in their heart and spirit. No matter how well intentioned, infantilizing the person will only cause them to feel worse.

It is not all downhill from here, at least not always. The journey through dementia is nonlinear with some remarkable breakthroughs here and there, often precipitated by the right context. Stories abound of persons who start speaking or smiling again after they are moved to a different environment, one where they feel safe, engaged and loved. The fact that a person struggles with initiating tasks does not mean that they are incapable of making any decisions. When in doubt, err on the side of exploring the person’s range of abilities. Preserving the ability to make choices, no matter how small, is especially crucial. Many times  partners or caregivers take over all aspects of a person’s life, unwillingly depriving that person from the opportunity to make even such a simple decision such as which clothes to wear. Which dress, the blue or the red one? All of us want to feel that we are still in control somehow. Asking “what to do” with the person can be the wrong question. We are part of a “doing” culture. Sometimes, all that is required of us is simply to “be” with a person, as in sharing moments sitting, walking, listening to music, watching a sunset or gently touching the person’s hand after we have asked for their permission. The more we understand, the easier it will be on the caregiver and the person in our care, whether we are caregivers of a family member or a stranger.

800Seniors is a distinguished nationwide Senior Healthcare referral service. They are based in Southern California, located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors offers seniors citizens a range of different health care options. Based upon their needs they can opt for Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Care Homes San Jose and Assisted Living nationwide. 800Seniors makes life easier by taking away the confusion and hassle. For more information about 800Seniors call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Brain Myths & Facts 101

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Never has there been a time when facts about the anatomy and functions of the human brain were so mainstream. Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, both debilitating diseases without a cure have become forefront in the consciousnesses of not just the medical profession, but the general population as well. Thanks to high profile personalities like the late president Ronald Reagan, Michael J. Fox and Maria Shriver who, along with their families have gone public to promote awareness about diseases of the brain, many lay people are likely to have some basic education about the human brain. Yet with all of the publicity, a new study surveying middle and high school students and their knowledge of the human brain and its functions, exposes a startling amount of misunderstanding.

Myth: The brain is separate from the nervous system.
Reality: Students often assume that the brain and the nervous system are separate, unrelated entities. Further studies have shown that they often believe organs such as the heart and lungs are part of the nervous system. In reality, the nervous system is composed of the brain, the spinal cord, neurons, and neural support cells.

Myth: The brain is a uniform mass of tissue.
Reality: The only exposure most students often have to brain anatomy is a photo or drawing of a gray, bulbous, wrinkled mass of tissue. Although the brain may appear uniform at a gross anatomic level, it is actually composed of billions of specialized cells. These cells, called neurons and glia, are further organized into specialized functional regions within the brain. This type of variation within the brain is what allows it to function as “command central” of the human body.

Myth: Control of voluntary activity is the sole purpose of the brain.
Reality: Many students have the misconception that the brain is used only when they are doing something, such as thinking or performing a physical action. Most do not recognize that we use our brains constantly for a variety of activities that, while crucial to our survival, require no conscious thought. For example, the human brain is responsible for involuntary activities, such as regulating heartbeat, breathing and digestion. Although the brain controls both voluntary and involuntary activities, different regions of the brain are devoted to each type of task.

Myth: The vertebral column and the spinal cord are the same thing.
Reality: The only exposure most students have to the human spine is as a component in models of skeletons. Thus, they may assume that the spine consists solely of the skeletal structure of the vertebral column, or backbone. They can feel their own backbone, and they know that it is a structural component of their body. Students may not realize that the backbone encases the spinal cord, a vital part of our nervous system.

Myth: The brain does not change.
Reality: The idea that the brain does not change after growth ceases may be the greatest misconception that most people have.  In reality, the brain changes throughout life. During embryonic development and early life, the brain changes dramatically. Neurons form many new connections, and some neurons die. However, scientists have discovered that changes in the brain are not restricted to early life.  Even in the adult brain, neurons continue to form new connections, strengthen existing connections, or eliminate connections as we continue to learn. Recent studies have shown that some neurons in the adult brain retain the ability to divide. Damaged neurons have some capability to regenerate if conditions are right.

Myth: Learning disabilities are the only manifestation of a problem with brain function.
Reality: During their school years, most students will encounter someone who has a learning disability. For many, this is their only experience with a brain disorder. Because many types of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease tend to affect older people, students may not have experience with them. They may not realize that emotional and behavioral conditions such as depression and hyperactivity are also brain disorders.
Diseases and injuries to the brain and nervous system afflict millions of Americans of all ages each year. Although some injuries and diseases are of short duration, others are permanent and disabling.

800Seniors is a distinguished nationwide Senior Healthcare referral service. They are based in Southern California, located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors offers seniors citizens a range of different health care options. Based upon their needs they can opt for Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Care Homes Chicago and Assisted Living nationwide. 800Seniors makes life easier by taking away the confusion and hassle. For more information about 800Seniors call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Marion Illinois Seniors Are Proud Of Their 3 Time World BBQ Champion Hometown

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Located at the southernmost tip of the state of Illinois, the city of Marion is an Interstate boomtown and serves the rural area as one of the region’s largest retail trade centers. Marion’s location, at the crossroads of Rt. 13 and Interstate 57 make it a prime candidate for future growth. In 2006, Marion became the home of one of the country’s largest Walmart Supercenter Stores. It measures a staggering 206,000 square feet and employees 500 workers. According to a special census conducted in 2008, Marion is home to 17,388 residents. The city’s longtime municipal leader, Mayor Robert L.”Bob” Butler has borrowed Boston, Massachusetts’s nickname, stating the city is “Marion: Hub of the Universe.” Marion is a conservative, Midwestern town that puts emphasis on tradition and family values. The city is home to several nursing and assisted living homes that provide options for its aging residents. 33.1% of all households in Marion are made up of individuals and 16.4% of those have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. 20% of Marion’s overall population is 65 years of age or older.

Marion is conveniently located near major cities such as St. Louis, MO to the west and Nashville, TN to the south. There are a number of lodging and dining options for out of town visitors wishing to visit friends or loved ones in assisted living homes. Currently, there are 14 hotels and motels inside the city limits as of July 2010. Overall, there are 1050 rooms inside the city limits. In addition, there are two additional motels and three small specialty lodging facilities outside the city limits but within the Marion zip code.  As of the summer of 2010, a new bed and breakfast was announced in the historic Queen Anne style Aikman mansion on Main Street in midtown. A variety of popular local restaurants in Marion include Walt’s, Bennie’s, 17th Street Bar and Grill (Three Time World Champion in BBQ), La Fiesta and Tequilas, Honeybakers, McAlister’s Deli, Thai-D Classic and Sao Asian Bistro.

Easy access from Interstate 57 has made Marion a market of choice for several popular chain restaurants like Applebee’s, Red Lobster and Cracker Barrel. Marion sits at the edge of the beautiful Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge and the Shawnee National Forest. Major attractions that compliment Marion hotels include Southern Illinois Miners’ games at Rent One Park, events at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, the two dozen wineries within a 45 mile radius of the city including those on the Shawnee Hills Wine Trail and Southern Illinois Wine Trail.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Assisted Living Residents Live Large & Think Big In Dallas

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Dallas has the essence and vitality of a city built on big dreams, freshly blazed trails and an attitude that all things are possible. This richly diverse city offers a thriving culinary scene, leading arts district, countless luxury accommodations, professional sports, trendy entertainment districts and endless shopping opportunities. The Dallas Fort Worth area exemplifies their “live large” philosophy by offering their senior population a multitude of choices for spending their retirement years. The area has many well rounded senior living communities offering independent and assisted living environments that provide various activities in the relaxing atmosphere of western culture. The city of Dallas is also big on pride when it comes to offering choices that allow their seniors to live their lives the way they want. It’s a simple, Texan concept that means you can take control of your time, find comfort in your surroundings, and be part of a community of friends and neighbors, whether it’s at a cookout, hoedown or day trip.

With a population of 1.3 million according to a 2009 US Census report, Dallas is currently the third most popular destination for business travel in the United States. The Dallas Convention Center is one of the largest and busiest convention centers in the country, at over 1,000,000 square feet and the world’s single largest column free exhibit hall. The Dallas Fort Worth Arlington Metroplex is the number one visitor and leisure destination in Texas. There are more than 30,000 hotel rooms in the city of Dallas with over 73,000 available throughout the surrounding area providing ample choices for out of town conventioneers and family or friends visiting their loved one in an assisted living residence. Dallas is centrally located and within a four hour flight from most North American destinations. It is served by two airports; Dallas/Ft. Worth International and Dallas Love Field that together provide more than 1,900 flights daily. Dallas Ft. Worth airport is also the hub city for American Airlines, the third largest airline in the country, as well as the headquarters for Southwest Airlines.  AMTRAK also provides daily service to Dallas via Union Station.

The climate in the “live large” city has an average minimum temperature of 55 degrees Fahrenheit and average maximum temperature of 76 degrees. Average annual rainfall is approximately 33 inches. Since 2000, the real estate market in the Dallas Forth Worth Metroplex has been relatively resilient. The Metroplex has one of the largest concentrations of corporate headquarters for publicly traded companies in the United States. The city of Dallas has twelve Fortune 500 companies, and DFW as a whole has 23. Between 2007 and 2008, Comerica Bank and AT&T located their headquarters in Dallas. Texas Instruments, a major manufacturer, employs 10,400 people at its corporate headquarters and chip plants in Dallas. Defense and aircraft manufacturing dominates the economy of nearby Fort Worth. In terms of the healthcare industry, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the world’s largest breast cancer organization was founded and is headquartered in Dallas.

The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School is located in the city’s Stemmons Corridor. It is one of the largest groupings of medical facilities in the world. The school is very selective, admitting only around 200 students a year. The facility enrolls 3,255 postgraduates and is home to four Nobel Laureates,  three in physiology medicine and one in chemistry. Aside from being the city that invented the frozen margarita, Dallas lives up to its claim of “thinking big,” with some of the following statistics under their hat:

During the winter holiday season, the Galleria Dallas is home to the country’s tallest indoor Christmas tree.
With the roof enclosed, the entire Statue of Liberty could fit into the new Cowboys Football Stadium. The largest permanent model train exhibit in the country is on display in the lobby of Dallas Children’s Medical Center. The Dallas Arts District is the largest urban arts district in the United States. The 52 foot ‘Big Tex’ statue that greets visitors at the annual State Fair of Texas is the tallest cowboy in Texas.
The Trinity River Corridor Project, when completed, will be more than 10 times the size of New York’s Central Park. The Dallas area is the largest metropolitan area in the nation not on a navigable body of water. Not surprisingly, The Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex is home to 41 of the richest Americans. On a historical note, The Dallas Public Library permanently displays one of the original copies of the Declaration of Independence, printed on July 4, 1776, and the First Folio of William Shakespeare’s “Comedies, Histories & Tragedies.” For Texans all throughout the big state and those seniors enjoying life in assisted living homes in the Dallas area, comfort is the “living large” feeling that means you are home!

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Dallas and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

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