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Posts Tagged ‘aging’

What Assisted Living Residents Need To Know If They Want To Live Past 60

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Every 70 seconds a senior is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. If you intend to live past the age of 60 you need to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease, especially since there is no cure. Today it is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. Our brains change as we age just as the rest of our organs do. Most of us notice some slowed thinking and occasional problems with remembering certain things. However, serious memory loss, confusion and other major changes in the way our minds work are not a normal part of aging. These may be signs that your brain cells are failing. September 21st was World Alzheimer’s Day, when the Alzheimer’s Association joined with organizations and people around the globe to raise awareness about the disease and its impact on families. Today, 35 million people worldwide are affected by Alzheimer’s as well as related forms of dementia and assisted living facilities have realized that this number is rapidly growing. Assisted living facilities are educating seniors about the deadly disease so they are aware of the signs, symptoms and possible precautionary methods.

World Alzheimer’s Day is an opportunity to raise donations and awareness about Alzheimer’s disease. There is a need for more education, support and research on this disease. As a citizen of society you can participate by joining one of the many World Alzheimer’s Day events within your community. Assisted Living Facilities celebrate this day by organizing fundraisers and events to help raise awareness. Memory Walk 2010 is a perfect example. Participants come together and walk in order to change the course of Alzheimer’s Disease. Memory Walk is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer care, support and research. Since 1989, Memory Walk has raised more than $300 million for the cause.

What Exactly Is Alzheimer’s Disease?
The human brain is your most unique and powerful organ, yet a healthy brain weighs only about three pounds. It has three main parts:
The Cerebrum fills up most of your skull. It is involved in remembering, problem solving, thinking, and feeling. It also controls movement.
The Cerebellum sits at the back of your head, under the cerebrum. It controls coordination and balance.
The Brain Stem sits beneath your cerebrum in front of your cerebellum. It connects the brain to the spinal cord and controls automatic functions such as breathing, digestion, heart rate and blood pressure.

The real work of your brain goes on in individual cells. An adult brain contains about 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons, with branches that connect at more than 100 trillion points. Scientists call this dense, branching network a “neuron forest.” Signals traveling through the neuron forest form the basis of memories, thoughts and feelings. Neurons are the chief type of cell destroyed by Alzheimer’s disease. Signals that form memories and thoughts move through an individual nerve cell as a tiny electrical charge. Nerve cells connect to one another at synapses. When a charge reaches a synapse, it may trigger release of tiny bursts of chemicals called neurotransmitters. The neurotransmitters travel across the synapse, carrying signals to other cells. Scientists have identified dozens of neurotransmitters.

Alzheimer’s disease disrupts both the way electrical charges travel within cells and the activity of neurotransmitters. 100 billion nerve cells! 100 trillion synapses! Dozens of neurotransmitters! This “strength in numbers” provides your brain’s raw material. Over time, our experiences create patterns in signal type and strength. These patterns of activity explain how, at the cellular level, our brains code our thoughts, memories, skills and sense of who we are. Alzheimer’s disease leads to nerve cell death and tissue loss throughout the brain. Over time, the brain shrinks dramatically, affecting nearly all of its functions.  Alzheimer’s gets worse over time, and is fatal. Visit alz.org to find a Memory Walk event in your area or locate another volunteer opportunity to help end the disease.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care Houston, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Facilities and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

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National Alzheimer’s Project Act Signed Into Legislation

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

The fact that the United States Congress voted unanimously on any legislation set before them, sent an extremely powerful signal. The National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA), signed by the President on January 4, 2011 turns a concept of need into a law of the land, a coordinated national plan to overcome the Alzheimer’s crisis. Passage of NAPA will ensure the coordination and evaluation of all national efforts in Alzheimer’s research, clinical care, institutional, home and community based programs and their outcomes. The new National Alzheimer’s Project office will be located within the Department of Health and Human Services and will oversee federal research on Alzheimer’s disease to develop a plan to combat the disease and eventually develop a cure. The office will be funded within the existing budget and does not require an appropriation.This is a major victory for the 5.3 million people who live with Alzheimer’s in this country and their nearly 11 million caregivers who take care of them. NAPA will confront one of the most feared and costly diseases that stands to plaque the baby boomer generation as they move into their senior years.

Given the scale of the Alzheimer epidemic and the growing number of Americans directly affected every single day, NAPA will provide an essential framework within the government that recognizes the Alzheimer crisis is no longer emerging, but is already here.
Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other intellectual abilities that are serious enough to interfere with daily life, worsens over time, and is fatal. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 50 to 70 percent of dementia cases. Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging; although the greatest known risk factor is increasing age, and the majority of people with Alzheimer’s are 65 and older. Alzheimer’s is not just a disease of old age however. Roughly, 10 percent of people with the disease have early onset Alzheimer’s that can appear when someone is in their 40s or 50s. For a nearly a decade, advocates of the disease have been petitioning for federal involvement to address the crisis.  In 2003, longtime advocate for those with disease, the Alzheimer’s Association was at the forefront of the effort to add early onset of the disease to the Compassionate Allowances List making it possible for victims to receive Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income. Inclusion on the SSA’s list was not accomplished until 2010. In 2007, then Speaker Newt Gingrich and AA’s Robert Egge made the case for creation of a federal Alzheimer strategy with an article, Developing a National Alzheimer’s Strategy Equal to the Epidemic.

Written by Egge, it garnered national attention when it was published in The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association. Also in 2007, the association launched the Alzheimer’s Study Group at a Capitol Hill Conference. In 2009, they released their final report calling for federal legislation to attack the challenges of the disease, currently the sixth leading cause of death in the nation. Based on the Alzheimer’s Study Group recommendations and following consultations with the Alzheimer’s Association, controversial former Sen. Mel Martinez (R-FL) and Evan Bayh (D-IN) introduced a measure to create a collaborated system for researching, treating and eliminating Alzheimer’s disease. The measure was introduced to Congress as the first National Alzheimer’s Project Act in July 2009. After various draftings in 2010, the bill progressed through the legislative branch until final congressional approval in December 2010 and the presidential signing in January 2011. The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support, advocacy, and research. Their mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Their vision, now supported by the federal government, is a world without Alzheimer’s.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care Phoenix, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Facilities and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Biomedical Researchers Have Reversed Aging In Mice

August 15, 2011 Leave a comment

The news could mean a remake of the movie, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, but with a much happier conclusion. Based on the 1922 fictional short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the movie plot is about a boy who is born with the appearance and physical traits of an elderly man. Because of his odd malady, he ages in reverse, growing younger as time goes by. His female love interest throughout the film is normal, creating the heart-wrenching scenario of the boy ultimately dying as an infant in the arms of his elderly lover. Harvard scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say for the first time they have partially reversed age-related degeneration in mice, resulting in new growth of the brain and testes, causing the return of lost cognitive function and improved fertility. The findings in the study, recently reported in the online version of the British journal, Nature, is perhaps a vital step in understanding what causes us to age and how to prevent it.

Scientists said they achieved the milestone in aging science by engineering mice with a controllable telomerase gene. Telomeres are the protective caps on the ends of the chromosomes in our body’s cells. The chromosomes are the string-like collections of genes in each cell’s nucleus.  Each time a cell splits, the telomeres at the end of its chromosomes shrink a little. Early in life, an enzyme that the body produces, called telomerase, rebuilds the telomeres. But as we age, the body stops producing telomerase and the telomeres are not rebuilt. They continue to shrink each time the cells reproduce. Eventually the telomeres reach a certain critical size and the cells stop reproducing. When our cells stop reproducing, we begin to experience the symptoms of aging caused by tissue degeneration throughout our body. By creating mice with a telomerase switch, the researchers were able to generate prematurely aged mice. The switch allowed the scientists to find out whether reactivating telomerase in the animals would restore and reverse the signs and symptoms of aging. The work showed a dramatic reversal of many aspects of aging, including reversal of brain disease and infertility as mentioned above.

The results may be powerful evidence that telomeres are indeed the key to aging. If somehow our own bodies could keep on producing telomerase, we would not age. We could remain youthfully vigorous indefinitely. Of course, this does not mean immortality is around the corner. Humans would still be subject to diseases, illnesses and accidents. Most significant in the findings is that diseases associated with advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and many forms of cancer, could be diminished to the vanishing point if our body’s cells remained youthful. That reality is still a long way from the Harvard work with laboratory mice; however, it could ultimately affect the human quest to prevent aging and the diseases that often strike as we grow older.

Trivia:  A chromosome is an organized structure of DNA and protein found in cells. It is a single piece of coiled DNA containing many genes and other regulatory elements. DNA contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms, in other words it determines the unique characteristics of who we are.

800Seniors is a distinguished nationwide Senior Healthcare referral service. They are based in Southern California, located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors offers seniors citizens a range of different health care options. Based upon their needs they can opt for Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Care Homes New York and Assisted Living nationwide. 800Seniors makes life easier by taking away the confusion and hassle. For more information about 800Seniors call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Good Oral Hygiene & Cognitive Function

August 11, 2011 Leave a comment

What does loving to eat Gummy Bears and hating the idea of flossing have in common? Both activities, and lack thereof, can contribute to plaque on your teeth, which is also surprisingly bad for your brain and other vital organs. According to Dr. Michael Roizen, co-author of YOU – The Owner’s Manual: An Insider’s Guide to the Body that Will Make You Healthier and Younger, “The plaque between teeth can cause an immune reaction that attacks arteries, which then can’t deliver vital nutrients to brain cells.” Studies suggest that gum disease, in particular, can affect the brain.  Some studies have found that older people with gum disease are more likely to have memory loss and other cognitive problems. Research reveals that diseased gums pump high levels of harmful bacteria into the bloodstream. The skin of the oral cavity is known as “oral mucosa.” It is very rich with blood vessels and if outside bacteria and the toxins that they produce get into the blood stream, they are off and running throughout your bodies.

According to a team of dentists and psychiatrists in the UK, oral health is clearly connected to cognitive health and therefore another reason to brush up on dental hygiene. There is growing interest in the relationships between aging, nutritional status, and cognitive function. Research in this area has tended to focus on advanced old age, although many of the pathways implicated may exist over a much longer period from early or mid-adult life. Oral health is recognized as being an important factor in nutritional status and general health. Periodontal disease is a common oral condition and a significant source of chronic infection and inflammation. Dietary changes because of poor oral health may lead to compromised nutritional status, both in general and through specific deficiencies.

valdemarrr by *valdemarrr on deviantART

Following a study involving 5,138 people aged 20 to 59; the researchers discovered that periodontal disease and gingivitis were linked to poorer cognitive function and not just in later years, but also throughout adult life. The survey included a comprehensive dental examination and a series of tests to determine cognitive function.  The Symbol Digit Substitution Test and Serial Digit Learning Test were administered to test cognitive ability. Both tests were provided in English or Spanish and were preceded by a practice segment.

In the SDST, a set of nine symbols matched to the digits 1 to 9 were presented to the subject. The participants were shown a series of symbols and were required to match a symbol with its corresponding digit as quickly as possible. This task aimed to measure information processing speed, concentration and motor control. Performance in SDST was scored as the average time in seconds needed to correctly match the numbers and symbols on the best two out of four trials. Those participants with recorded data on both oral health status and individual measures of cognitive function were selected for a planned secondary analysis. In a subsample of participants aged 20 to 59 years, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol and smoking status were considered as potential confounding factors; there was little evidence of this from the analysis. The association between cognitive function and oral health status seemed to be present in the results of the research study, indicating the far-reaching consequences of proper oral hygiene throughout life and for the elderly.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care Los Angeles, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Facilities and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors Dance Their Way To Health And Happiness

August 8, 2011 Leave a comment

One young audience member said, “Adults should stop dancing after the typical college years, around age 22 or 23.”  Undoubtedly, many young people have claimed a state of embarrassment after seeing their baby boomer parents dancing up a storm at a family wedding reception or special event. Decades of research however, show that friendship circles that include dancing reduce stress, boost self esteem and ease anxiety about aging. Friends can be particularly beneficial for seniors because peers often share medical tips and encourage one another to stay healthy. Fifty three year old, Deborah McVay, decided to start dancing after having an aneurysm, heart attack and stroke all in the course of a year. Her doctors told her that if she survived, she would not be able to walk or talk again. Apparently, she made a pact with God that if she could ever move again, she would start dancing.

Many aging baby boomers haven’t had to experience health events as extreme as McVay did, but they’re finding that dancing not only has physical health benefits but is great for morale. Independent, retirement and assisted living communities already know that exercise and 70s disco is a winning combination. Many incorporate dancercise classes into their health and fitness programs as a way for residents to have fun while getting the physical benefits as well. McVay took her love of dancing one step further when she started the dance troop, Sassie Seniors out of Memphis, TN. She claims she has an alter ego, “Deyonce,” in admiration her younger counterpart, Beyonce. McVay and the eleven other members of the dance group get a chance to tap into their inner Beyonce with bounces, pops and shakes on stage. As the women perfect their struts and slides, youngsters frequently peak inside their rehearsals to watch the dancing divas who are young at heart.

dancing happy couple by *fahrmboy-stock on deviantART

The kids who frequent the South Memphis center look up to the Sassies, said group member Geneva “Soul Diva” Johnson, who is 50. “I think it lets children know that age ‘ain’t’ nothing but a number,” said Johnson. “We are living our life like it’s golden and cherishing each moment that we’re here.” Strutting in fishnet stockings and four inch heels, the ladies are regular performers at political events and charity fundraisers. They have also served as the halftime act at some high school jamborees and also perform liturgical dances.  However, it is the over 50 troupe’s tribute to Beyonce that is most popular. “The crowd goes wild because the first thing that people say is that they can’t believe that the older people are showing up the younger people,” said McVay.
Proving that baby boomers can still find the beat is the group’s gift to the world. Their enduring friendship is the Sassies’ gift to themselves. The women celebrate each other’s milestones at monthly dinners. The group supports their “sisters” during life’s challenging moments.

The Sassie Seniors are a great example of how embracing the aging process and taking   health issues into stride can make a positive difference in the quality of one’s life. Many boomers entering their retirement years may start experiencing some of the slow downs that come naturally with age, but it doesn’t mean they have to stop having fun. Many aging seniors in assisted living communities have conditions that require some assistance or extra help with some of life’s daily activities.  The extra support and security provided in assisted living allows them to participate in fun activities and enjoy life. As a Sassie Diva might say, “Chill and rock out.”

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Chicago and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

The Role Of Aging May Be Dispelled In Assisted Living Facilities

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

“Since it is the “other” within us who is old, it is natural that the revelation of our age should come to us from outside – from others.” -Simone de Beauvoir

The psychological axiom of the quote could be described as: what we think about a person influences how we will perceive them; how we perceive them influences how we will behave towards them; and how we behave toward them ultimately shapes who they are. So, on what basis do we think about older people?  Because of the social patterns of age segregation in our society, we are tracked through time with our age mates: in school, from kindergarten through high school and often college; in youth organizations, such as Cub Scouts through Eagle Scouts, the young and old rarely have meaningful interactions outside of the family.

A study by the Center on Aging at the University of Maryland found that children of all ages had limited knowledge and negative attitudes about old people. In fact, only 39 of the 180 children surveyed were able to name an older person they know outside of their family. As a result, the young are inclined to view the old stereotypically, and not to think about their own aging.  Each group has its own “social clock” for judging the age appropriateness of various role activities, such as the “right” time for getting married, starting a family, “peaking” in one’s career, or retiring. Together, these age linked stages of life provide the individual a standardized timetable by which they might gauge the “correctness” of their life trajectory in terms of being “on time.”

Good Old Love by *enkana on deviantART

Being creatures of comparison, people have a tendency to compare their present selves with their former selves along with stories of significant others when they were at a similar stage. The American public holds a consistent image of what it’s like to be old and what the typical older person is like. The consistency is important considering the old are the most heterogeneous of any age group since we all age differently biologically, psychologically, and sociologically. It is significant that the elderly share this same stereotype of themselves, even though many generally perceive themselves to be exceptions.

In an AARP survey, “Images of Aging in America,” 1,200 adults age 65 and older were asked to rate a series of problems people face based on two criteria: how it affects them personally and how they believe the problems affect other people over 65 years of age.  The percent of individuals age 65 and over who rated the perceived problem as very serious for themselves and others were as follows:
Fear of crime        37% for themselves and 69% for others over 65
Not enough money    12% for themselves and 55% for others over 65
Loneliness        6% for themselves and 46% for others over 65
Poor health        15% for themselves and 57% for others over 65
Being needed    8% for themselves and 41% for others over 65
Keeping busy:    4% for themselves and 26% for others over 65

The results are revealing, and somewhat encouraging. Although seniors may recognize that many in their same “social clock” age group may have problems they view as serious, they don’t seem to think of themselves as being that in that category. Perhaps the survey was conducted in a successful assisting living facility where residents are encouraged to drop the stereotypes and live life with zeal without dwelling on the problems associated with age!

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living Phoenix and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

Seniors Helping Seniors

July 6, 2011 Leave a comment

The hair around his temples has gotten a little gray.  He doesn’t always react when you walk by because his hearing has gotten poor. His eyesight is slowly failing and oftentimes he doesn’t seem to notice you’re there. Some times when I watch him, he’s just staring off into space. He sits for hours in his favorite chair and when he gets up, he’s a little old man, arthritic and sore. His affection level is still high though, and he is always anxious to talk, but go for a walk, no way.  He just doesn’t have as much energy as he did when he was younger. He is a senior, a senior dog. Yet in spite of his aging, he is no less needed or loved by his family. Just as it does with humans, the aging process affects pets. Many times, as human seniors begin to slow down, they feel depressed and find it more difficult to find meaning in their lives.

Assisted living communities are home like atmospheres where many seniors are choosing to spend part of their retirement years.  They have as much independence as they want with the knowledge that personal care and support services are available if needed. The communities offer exercise, entertainment, activities and delicious meals and the opportunity to socialize and make new friends. There has been much success in independent and assisted living communities, nursing homes and hospitals when trained, therapy dogs visit with residents. Diane and David Pierce of St. Louis, Missouri, took it one step further. After spending several years working for animal rescues and fostering over sixty dogs, they decided to start an adoption service that specifically matched senior dogs with seniors still living in their homes. Senior Dogs 4 Seniors has three programs to accommodate both the needs of the senior dog and the senior owner’s capability for caring for them. They have set up charities and volunteer programs to carry out the services

an old man and his dog by *Heinay on deviantART

A – Adoption
Clients are asked to pay a one-time adoption fee.
B – Basic Care
The basic care plan includes routine veterinary care and grooming services. Their volunteers will pick up the dog and take them to the vet or groomer and return them to the owner
C – Complete Care
The complete care plan includes routine veterinary care and grooming services as well as a monthly visit to deliver dog food, medications, heartworm preventatives, flea and tick preventatives. The plan also covers trimming the dog’s nails and cleaning up the yard.

There are a number of reasons that so many older dogs find themselves without homes. The top reasons for dogs being relinquished to animal shelters include:
Moving – Landlord issues – Cost of pet maintenance – No time for pet – Inadequate facilities – Too many pets in home – Pet illness – Personal problems – Biting

Senior Dogs 4 Seniors evaluate the dogs and the needs of the seniors who will be adopting them prior to the adoption placement.
What it means to the dogs:
It is difficult to find homes for senior dogs and they are often put to sleep because no one has time for them. Older pets make great companions, especially for seniors. The majority of older pets are already housebroken, have been trained to walk on a leash, and are calmer and more settled in life.
What it means to the people:
Pets Lower Blood Pressure. A study of healthy patients showed that people over 40 who own pets have lower blood pressure than people who do not have pets. Another study showed that talking to pets decreased blood pressure.

Fewer Trips to the Doctor. Seniors who own dogs go to the doctor less often than those who do not. In a study of 1,000 Medicare patients, even the most highly stressed dog owner/guardians in the study had 21 percent fewer physician contacts than non dog owner/guardians.
Less Depression. Studies show that seniors with pets do not become depressed as often as those without pets.
Easier to Make Friends. Seniors with pets meet more people and like to talk about their pets.
Seniors become More Active. Seniors with pets go for more walks and are generally more active than those without pets.
Pets are Friends. Most everyone, but especially seniors, will say that pets are their friends.
Pets Ease Loss. Elderly people who suffer the loss of a spouse and own a pet are less likely to experience deterioration in health following that stressful event.
Pets Fight Loneliness. You are less likely to be lonely with a canine friend around.
Seniors Take Better Care of Themselves. Seniors take good care of their pets and better care of themselves when they own a pet.
A Sense of Security. Pets help seniors to feel that someone they trust is always around.

800Seniors.com is a leading referral system in the Elderly Healthcare industry. We are located on 5400 Atlantis Court, Moorpark, California 93021. 800Seniors.com provides the perfect match between seniors searching for health care provisions such as Home Care, Home Health, Skilled Nursing, Hospice Care, Medical Supplies, as well as a variety of Assisted Living San Jose and Care Homes nationwide. Take the confusion and hassle out of the search. For more information call 1-800-768-8221, visit http://800seniors.com or fax us your details at (805)517-1623.

About The Author: Gloria Ha’o Schneider is an expert in senior citizen and baby boomer issues. Her topics revolve around Senior Living and Healthcare to provide the latest information to this demographic as well as their families and loved ones.

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